6 Tips for Planning a Secure Remote Cabin

Creekside cabin site

6 Tips for Planning a Remote Cabin

Many like the idea of having a cabin tucked away in the woods where they can go to enjoy nature and get away from it all. How to keep the cabin safe from intruders and large animals when you are not there and how to afford it in the first place are two major questions
“Sitting in front of a crackling campfire at a cabin is one of the great joys in life “ says William Edward Summers, principal of California and British Columbia based design firm William Edward Summers Creative Projects
1) Find a cabin solution that will not strain your budget. It can be a financially difficult to build a cabin or a remote retreat, yet many view having such a location as a necessity. Many more just want to have a place to get away to enjoy the wilderness. Making these desires a reality requires an affordable feasible solution that will be small and simple
2) Consider how you can achieve reasonable security for your cabin. When you finally build a cabin how will you keep it secure from intruders or large animals? The truth is that no matter where your cabin is located some boys or young men will come across it and want to get inside. Preventing your cabin from being obvious by using stealthy design strategies to reduce it’s profile will reduce access by the curious passersby.
3) Make your remote cabin solution easy to construct. With an unlimited budget it is possible to build the cabin of your dreams in any location however one real challenge is being able to realistically build in a remote location with your budget. You will want a structure that is rugged but simple enough that it will not require a large crew and major equipment.
4) Make sure that you have planned a cabin that can be built from a pick up truck so materials can be easily brought to the remote site
5) Build at least as large as a large tent. It makes sense to build large enough for several people. More than one small discreet cabin might be a good strategy if additional space is needed. That way you can at least get a minimum shelter in place sooner and expand your site if necessary.
6) Plan for long term use in the event that a place is needed in which to ride out a natural disaster, survive a bout with homelessness or just to get away from the madness. Consider installing a small wood burning stove and other basics for long term use at your cabin site.

Please use the form to order a free report entitled

The “Keep it Simple Guide to Building  a Secure Remote Cabin” by William Edward Summers


The new design project titled “The Remote Stealth Cabin” by William Edward Summers can be examined at :
https://designenvelope.wordpress.com/plans-for-sale/the-remote-stealth-cabin/

Mountain cabin site

For more information about the designer, William Edward Summers, please visit:
Official Site:
http://www.designenvelope.com
Mobile Friendly:
http://www.designenvelope.wordpress.com
Other Articles:
http://www.designenvelope.com/articles

Advertisements

Stealth Housing

stealth housing

Stealth Housing

by William Edward Summers

There is always a need for housing, however during hard times, such as are currently affecting  many countries, obtaining a roof overhead is becoming increasingly challenging. The alarming inflation in house prices not only creates difficulties for those seeking to buy, but is also a budget buster for renters. In this situation, as in so many others, creative thinking will help those in need of adequate shelter to find viable solutions. A place to live can be many types of places, and situations.

Stealth, or brown bag housing, is a situation where an existing non-residential building is re-purposed into shelter, without substantially modifying the exterior. Often the main requirement is a full bathroom, and at least an ad hoc kitchenette for sheds, garages, or offices to be useful as homes. In fact, one way to obtain immediate rental income is to add a full bath to any structure.

In climates with cold winters, insulation and a good heat source, such as a wood burning stove, is essential. There are small wood stoves that that give off adequate heat for a tiny space, and if they have a flat top, the stove will have the added benefit of being a place for a tea kettle.

In a converted shed, or garage, insulation and a little work will be needed. However insulation comes in rolls, pre-sized to fit between the standard 16″ on center studs, and can be easily installed with a heavy duty staple gun. Minor electrical work, and a carpet to cover the concrete floor will help finish off the space.

Personally, I like sheds, and fondly remember the shed we had in our rear yard, back home. We had inherited our house from my great Aunt who lived there around the turn of the last century, before the days of indoor plumbing. We still had her old, long unused, outhouse, chicken coop, hand pump, and the old shed that once been a single car garage, and shop. That shed was the place I would go to think and daydream. It was a wonderful place. Perhaps, because of those memories, I think that sheds offer an easy, and romantic, solution to a need for shelter.

tiny green house

Another unconventional space is a converted shipping container. This could offer the ultimate solution for international portability, all that is needed is a place to park it. The website, escapeartist.com has an excellent article about how to convert a shipping container for residential use:

http://www.escapeartist.com/Nomadic_Housing/Container/

Finally, another type of “brown bag” solution is the conversion of commercial space into residential. Years ago, after the divorce from my first wife, I lived for a year in a converted store front near “People’s Park” in Berkeley, California. Outside it looked like a store, with the windows obscured. I used a large sheet of raw, painter’s canvas, to cover the window, which created a soothing quality of light, when the sun shone through. It had a full bathroom, and kitchen, high ceilings and was very quiet, and convenient. All this for a fraction of what apartments so near the campus would have cost.

What can be used as a home is limited only by the imagination. Such places as service station shops, school buses, and retail loft storage areas, are among the many places that have been converted to homes. During hard times, creatively thinking about where you can live, will help keep a roof overhead.